Limestone & Travertine

Limestone is a sedimentary rock with qualities similar to marble. Available in a wide range of neutrals and whites, limestone countertops have a smooth appearance, unlike granite. Formed from sand and the shells of aquatic life, limestone frequently includes small fossils and shells; some homeowners particularly value this unique aspect of limestone countertops.

However, like marble, limestone is a soft rock: it tends to stain and scratch easily and is susceptible to etching. Your limestone counter can be sealed to help prevent staining and etching, but limestone is not recommended for high use areas such as kitchens. Lemon juice will even mar the surface of the counter. You are not to leave any liquid standing on the countertops, even water, for a short period of time because it could sink in and stain.

Limestone countertops require a lot of regular sealing applications to keep them from staining.Natural stone is very porous. The best way to prevent stains is to treat the surface with a protective sealer. The sealer fills in the pores and repels spills on the surface, allowing you time to completely wipe it away. Limestone is a preferred surface for indoor and outdoor flooring where staining becomes less of a concern.

Travertine is a form of limestone with unique porous veins that give the milled tile their beauty. The stone is found in a wide variety of natural colors, and four different finishes may be applied to individual tiles. Travertine has long been used in many of the most beautiful buildings in the world.

Today, in addition to being an excellent flooring material, travertine tiles may also be used as pavers, countertops, stair treads, columns, sinks, and even bathtubs. Italian travertine and marble is generally perceived to be of the highest quality because the quarries and manufacturing centers are well established. Turkey has a large amount of travertine and is home to many of the most skilled quarries in the world.

Natural stone derived from limestone, such as travertine, is perceived to be a luxury item and is used in residential and commercial spaces to achieve a visual effect that communicates success, good taste, and affluence. However, because the stone is porous, the possibility of staining is present. This has led to the overall perception that travertine is a luxurious surface that lacks practicality. Fortunately, modern methods of milling and sealing the stone make staining much less worrisome leaving one with simply the aspect of luxury.

Travertine stone tile adds a lifetime of beauty to your home, but only if it’s properly cared for. Before deciding that travertine stone is the best option for your home, it’s important to understand what’s involved in the cleaning and maintenance of travertine. You wouldn’t purchase a car without learning about its safety features or gas mileage. If you want your travertine stone tile to last a lifetime, you need to learn the ins and outs of proper travertine stone care.

Because travertine is considered a marble and comes from the limestone family, you should never use an acid or chemical cleaner when caring for the surface. There are many cleaners readily available for stone cleaning. Your stone supplier or installer can direct you to the best cleaner available for your travertine stone.

Limestone & Travertine Colors

Do you want to bring beauty and style to your next project? We are ready to make it happen!